River Rinse

Buckingham River Rinse is taking place on Sunday 25th September and Sunday 9th October 2022. The stretches of river that are due to be cleared will be confirmed nearer the time.

Volunteers are not required to go in the river and will be issued with a litter picker, gloves and rubbish sacks.

This project takes place with the help of Stowe Sub Aqua Club.

 

Buckingham Dog Show

The annual Buckingham Dog Show is back this year on Sunday 11th September 2022 and we can’t wait to crown the best pooch in town! Registration will start from 11am and then judging will commence from 12pm. Application forms can be picked up at the registration table on the day or you can print one and fill it out before arriving.

Classes:

  • Cutest Puppy 5-12 mths
  • Fabulous Fella
  • Gorgeous Gal
  • Best Rescue
  • Dog Most Like Its Owner
  • Golden Oldie 7yrs & Over
  • Waggiest Tail
  • Junior Handler 16yrs & Under
  • The winner of each class goes through to Best In Show

£1.50 per class – Cash Only.

There will also a host of doggy based stalls and entertainment to browse.

Picnic on the Pitch

event poster

 

To celebrate the Queens Platinum Jubilee, join us for a Picnic on the Pitch. On Saturday 4th June 2022 from 11am-3pm, we invite everyone to Lace Hill Sports & Community Centre for a fantastic afternoon of FREE family entertainment. Meet up with family and friends, bring a blanket and enjoy some live music, games, and bar.

 

Celebrate Buckingham Day

After a great first event last summer, Celebrate Buckingham is coming back on Thursday 2nd June 2022 from 11am-3pm in Bourton Park to kick start the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee celebrations that the Town Council have organised.

Stalls from local community, voluntary and social enterprise groups will sit alongside fun activities including a bouncy castle, bungee run and cadet games. You can even test just how squeamish you are and have a try at maggot racing! There will also be a Jubilee Dress through the Ages contest that you can enter on the day.

Some great food and drink vendors will be attending so make sure to save plenty of room for lunch:

Live entertainment will include the Buckingham Ukulele Group and Winslow Concert Band. A doodle artist and face painter will also be attending to capture the day and to have some jubilee fun.

Come along to meet:

The Film Place – Buckingham
Buckingham Community Pantomime
Berks, Bucks and Oxon Wildlife Trust– BBOWT
Buckingham Canal Society
The Friends of Buckingham University
Buckingham AED Project
Young Carers YC2 Buckingham and Winslow
Community Care North Bucks Hospital Car Service
1563 (Buckingham) Squadron ATC
Buckingham Twinning Association
Buxplore
Buckingham West End Bowls Club
Buckingham Action Group for Cancer Research UK
Buckingham TIC
National Women’s Register Buckingham Branch
Florence Nightingale Hospice Charity – Buckingham
Buckingham & District Angling Association

Buckingham Society

Buckingham Fairtrade

National Trust Stowe and Aylesbury Vale

Buckingham and Winslow District Scout Group

Buckingham Evangelical Church

Friends of Buckingham University

Chandos Park Bowls Club

Buckingham District Girlguiding

Buckingham Rotary Club

For more information and updates, visit our Facebook event page.

Are you a local community group that would like to take part? Please get in touch with admin@buckingham-tc.gov.uk to find out more.

May Day

Children from local primary schools will be taking part in the May Day celebrations on Tuesday 3rd May 2022 with traditional country dancing and may pole dancing on the green outside St. Peter and St. Paul’s Church from 11am.

Holocaust Memorial Day

A new Holocaust Memorial Day Stone will be unveiled at the eastern end of Bourton Park on Thursday 27th January 2022 at 11am in order to provide somewhere for people to reflect during the year, as well as a focal point for the annual day of remembrance.

The event will be led by the Town Mayor as a reflective, respectful and Covid-safe inauguration for the Holocaust Memorial Day stone.

River Rinse

Buckingham River Rinse is taking place on Sunday 25th September and Sunday 9th October 2022. The stretches of river that are due to be cleared will be confirmed nearer the time.

Volunteers are not required to go in the river and will be issued with a litter picker, gloves and rubbish sacks.

This project takes place with the help of Stowe Sub Aqua Club.

 

Buckingham’s River Great Ouse is on the way to Recovery Thanks to Regular Monitoring

The river Great Ouse running through Buckingham’s town centre is showing very promising signs of recovery, thanks to regular river invertebrate (riverfly) monitoring, now taking place by local River Wardens!

The River Warden group (initially formed in late 2019), in response to the devastating pollution incident in 2018 with the support from Buckingham Town Council and the Environment Agency, have now been trained to take monthly samples of the river. The training occurred on 18th July 2021, by an accredited Riverfly Training Instructor:

“It was brilliant to deliver a Riverfly Partnership Workshop in Chandos Park on Sunday and to be able to support the hugely valuable River warden scheme following your devastating pollution incident, the interest in the river and awareness of the park visitors was really inspiring.” - Ian Hawkins, East Anglian Riverfly Hub Coordinator

This training as part of the Anglers’ Riverfly Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) which is hosted by the Freshwater Biological Association (FBA), allows these newly trained Riverfly Monitors to score the health of the river, based on the presence and abundance of specific riverfly target groups. This ultimately aims to improve existing river monitoring in the local area and help detect and deter future pollution incidents.

"I thoroughly enjoyed the Riverfly monitoring training session, after studying the theory it was lovely to put it into practice.  The session involved taking samples from the river, identifying and separating the indicator species and finally counting them before returning them to the river." – Ruth Newell (River Warden)

 Riverflies consist of caddisflies, stoneflies and mayflies which live most of their lives as larvae on the bed of rivers, emerging as short-lived adult flies. Acting as a biological indicators of river health, and being very sensitive or even intolerant of pollution, these invertebrates respond very quickly to pollution. Through this regular monitoring, trigger levels can be set, so that if they were to fall below the set threshold for this site, it would raise the alert of poor water quality.

During the training workshops, six of the eight indicator target groups were found in good numbers, demonstrating very promising river health and recovery. These included excellent numbers of olives (Baetidae), which are a family of small fast-swimming mayfly larvae, often called ‘agile darters’, along with abundant Gammarus (freshwater shrimp). There were decent numbers of larger burrowing mayflies (Ephemeridae) which are powerful 3-tailed swimmers that burrow into silt, good numbers of cased caddisfly larvae (Tricoptera), which make tube-like cases from stones, grains and plant material, along with the occasional caseless caddis.

Of greatest interest though were the several blue winged olives found (Ephemerellidae), which are particularly sensitive to pollution, demonstrating that the river health is surprisingly good. A stone loach fish was also recorded which was a species not re-stocked by the Environment Agency since the pollution event.

“This is certainly very encouraging news indeed, that given the chance, the river system can be quite resilient and is able to bounce back to its former health following such a catastrophic pollution incident just three years prior. Presence of all these invertebrates will not only provide food for fish, mammals, birds, and bats, but will also reassure the residents of Buckingham that their local river is healthy and safe.” - River Warden Coordinator, Ruth Coxon from The Conservation Volunteers (TCV).

The Buckingham & Gawcott Charitable Trust have made this training possible, by funding the riverfly training workshops and equipment needed for continued monitoring.

A public presentation of the cheque was made by Trust Chairman Councillor Robin Stuchbury during the morning training session on Sunday 18th July at Chandos Park, which turned out to be one of the hottest days of the year so far.

“It was great to see such interest from the public also enjoying the space at Chandos park with many passers-by, including young children, often showing an interest in the group’s activities, and asking what we were doing. Most were aware of the pollution incident 3 years ago and were pleased to hear that the river was recovering well.” - River Warden Coordinator, Ruth Coxon

Now trained up, the River Warden Group will be able to conduct monthly riverfly monitoring and input the results as publicly accessible data to the Riverfly Partnership’s online database. Monitoring efforts here will hopefully deter future acts of pollution and keep the river clean, healthy and thriving with wildlife for years to come.

“Riverfly sampling is an incredibly important tool in monitoring the river for water quality and in these days when the Environment Agency are under financial pressure with reduced ability to monitor water quality as they would have in the past. It is local volunteers who are needed to fill that space. If anyone is interested in joining I am sure that Ruth Coxon would welcome them and hopefully a number of further sampling sites can be created and monitored along the river to demonstrate the remarkable resilience and recovery of the river and to keep watch and report quickly any future incident of pollution.” Ian Hawkins, East Anglian Riverfly Hub Coordinator.

The River Warden group look forward to seeing how the health of the river improves. For more information about The Conservation Volunteers and the wide range of projects occurring nationally, please visit: https://www.tcv.org.uk.

Wellbeing Wednesday: Mental Wellbeing During A Pandemic

Taking care of your mind as well as your body is really important if Coronavirus means you are still spending a lot of time at home. You may feel bored, frustrated or lonely. You may also feel low or anxious, or concerned about your finances, your health or those close to you but it’s important to remember that it’s okay to feel this way. The tips and advice here come from the Department of Public Health and Mind, and are things you can do to help you keep on top of your mental wellbeing.

Stay connected with others

Maintaining healthy relationships with people you trust is important for your mental wellbeing. Think about how you can stay in touch with friends and family. This could be through a simple phone call, video call or even a text message. Try to set aside some time in your day or week to check in with others because they might need just as much support as you do.

Talk about your worries

Remember that it is okay to share your concerns with others you trust. If you cannot speak to someone you know or if doing so has not helped, there are plenty of helplines you can try instead.

  • Call CALM on 0800 58 58 58
  • Call Samaritans on 0330 094 5717 or text 116 123.
  • Call Mind Infoline on 0300 123 3393
  • Text SHOUT on 85258 to reach crisis volunteers 24/7. Texts are free.

Look after your body

Our physical health can also impact how we feel. Try to eat healthy, well-balanced meals, stay hydrated and exercise regularly. Going for a walk, run or bike ride is a great way to lift your mood and clear your head. Regular physical activity is associated with lower rates of depression and anxiety across all age groups. But it doesn’t need to be particularly intense for you to feel good, slower-paced activities such as walking can be just as beneficial. Need some inspiration? Take a look at some of our blog posts outlining activities that can help you to stay active during this time.

Keep your mind active

Make an effort to focus on your favourite hobby. However, if you don’t have one, picking something new to learn at home might also help to stop feeling anxious or worried. This is because continued learning through life enhances self-esteem and higher levels of wellbeing. So, why not learn something new today? You could read, write, play games, do crosswords, complete Sudoku puzzles or even start to draw or paint. Whatever it is, find something that works for you.

Get as much sunlight, fresh air and nature as you can

Bringing nature into your everyday life can benefit both your mental and physical wellbeing. It can improve your mood, reduce feelings of stress, and make you feel more relaxed. There are plenty of lovely open parks and greenspaces within Buckingham that you can utilise on your daily outings; don’t miss out on beautiful free experiences in your local area!